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42% of employers unaware of company health initiatives

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Employers are failing to implement health and wellbeing measures for staff members, particularly those who are ageing.

That is according to JLT’s 250 Club report into employee benefits, which found that 42 per cent of employers are not aware of whether they even have a health programme in place within their corporation.

This comes despite the fact that 75 per cent of company leaders say they would like to offer employees some sort of health initiative, as long as they can be sure it will bring a return on investment.

JLT’s research particularly highlighted the fact that UK employers were failing to do enough to support their ageing workforce – something that will be increasingly important to do, as many people are likely to work until their mid-seventies in order to build up a sufficient retirement fund.

And while 25 per cent of bosses think it is “very important” to have a programme in place to help older workers remain in good health, many are still not doing ensure this is a reality.

JLT called the findings “particularly alarming”, especially after research by the Longevity Centre revealed that only 32 per cent of people would be regarded as “healthy” when they reached the age of 65.

The company’s employee benefits director Bernie Clark explained that this means employers will increasingly be challenged by the far greater need for health support of their ageing workforce.

“While over 80 per cent of employers recognise the need to put in place a health and wellbeing programme, many are yet to put this into action.

“This may be because it is still early days for wellbeing programmes and employers are waiting to see concrete results from the forerunners, for example increased productivity and reduced absentee levels,” he added.