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Office workers blame weight gain on ‘diet saboteurs’

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Office workers are blaming their colleagues for their bulging waistlines, a new study has revealed.

A study of employees conducted in Yorkshire and the Humber found that more than half put on weight in the 12 months after starting an office job.

Some 52 per cent of respondents reported gaining weight after going to work in an office, with the average amount gained standing at a hefty ten pounds.

However, just 29 per cent of those surveyed by The Co-operative Food attributed their weight gain to a lack of self-control and willpower.

Indeed 71 per cent blame their colleagues for their inability to diet.

Respondents said their co-workers bring in too many snacks and treats to the office and they cannot resist sampling them.

Janet Taylor, diet and health manager for The Co-operative Food, said the office appears to be a ‘no go area’ for people trying to stick to a healthier diet.

“Boredom levels and the temptation to snack on unhealthy foods from ‘diet saboteurs’ are causing colleagues to pile on the pounds,” she claimed.

Last month, a study conducted by fashion retailer High and Mighty found that 42 per cent of office workers have gained up to a stone in a year as they feast during the working day.

Men were found to be the worst culprits, with half of those surveyed claiming to eat regular snacks while they are working.

Some 30 per cent of male workers said they cannot resist when food is being passed around the office, compared to just 17 per cent of women.