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Office workers can remain healthy by continuing to work

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Working for longer could help office workers remain healthy as they approach their later years, it has been suggested.

According to cognitive neuroscientist and business improvement strategist Dr Lynda Shaw, office employees should consider staying in the workplace as long as they can.

She said remaining in work makes people healthier because it instils self-worth and value.

For some people, the alternative is depression and a sedentary lifestyle that can be associated with retirement. Dr Shaw stated.

“Depression is enormously on the increase and so is stress and anxiety coming from loneliness, isolation and lack of self-worth post leaving employment,” she noted.

“Many retirees I have talked with have said they don’t know how to fill their day and feel older since quitting work.”

She said people can age more healthily by staying in work as long as their work is “fulfilling and not drudgery”.

Staying sharp on the job can help office workers stay mentally fit and healthy, Dr Shaw added.

“Those who retire earlier often become sedentary sooner and develop health issues. Physical work though of course is another matter altogether,” she stated.

“Furthermore we all know that job loss for any age group can have a detrimental effect on physical, mental and emotional health.”

The expert said this not only includes the health of the individual, but also affects the wellbeing of their families and loved ones.

She suggested that “70 is the new 50” in the workforce – with older employees seeming to have stronger writing, grammar and spelling skills in English, and a stronger work ethic.

“We have this wonderful bank of talent in the older generation, why are we throwing it away in business?” she questioned.