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One in four staff will kiss at the office Christmas party

ServicedofficeBENews801232620

A quarter of office staff will share a kiss at the office Christmas party, according to a study carried out by TGI Fridays.

As the festive period starts to draw nearer and companies up and down the country reward employees with a chance to let their hair down, many will see their guard drop too.

In the poll, which took the experiences of 2,000 staff into consideration, one in four said they have been involved in a Christmas kiss at work party.

Human resources staff are the most likely to take part in a kiss with 55 per cent in the sector saying they have kissed a fellow employee.

Those in public relations are the most inclined to go a step further and end up spending the night with someone from their office after the annual Christmas bash.

Such behaviour can have far reaching consequences, however, as mixing business and pleasure is always a risky business and everyone still has to work together.

The risk is not just associated with the person who a moment was shared with, but also depends on who else from the company noticed what was going on.

Being the subject of office gossip does not present a professional persona and should be avoided, even if alcohol is to blame.

A temptation to drink too much can be overwhelming for many, as the party is generally funded by the company and in some cases is a rare opportunity for staff to get something back from their employers.

Office workers who secret hold feelings for colleagues often use the Christmas party as a place to air these, with two per cent of respondents admitting to declaring their love at the event.

As well as amorous feelings presenting themselves, one in five people let alcohol get the better of them and express their feelings of dislike to other colleagues.

Bankers are the profession most likely to make a drunken fool of themselves, teachers phone in sick and those who work in the travel and leisure sector are most likely to perform a striptease.

Whatever profession a worker is in, it is advisable to drink moderately and retain some self control, as office parties span a dangerous line between being a social and a professional event.