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Staff favour approachable bosses

Employees would like a boss which makes them feel comfortable in favour of them possessing any other trait, according to a new survey.

Over three-quarters of staff responding to a study by recruitment company Reed said that they would prefer their leader to be approachable and not make them feel awkward.

The research involved nearly 2,200 people – 712 of whom were managers themselves.

Other desirable traits included the ability for bosses to admit when they have made mistakes – of which 71 per cent of respondents wanted to see – being calm when put under pressure and the ability to give clear instructions and targets.

Acknowledging their employees’ work efforts was a further quality which 66 per cent said they would like to experience.

One finding from the survey was that the level of face-to-face contact with managers is reducing thanks to advances in modern technology – with a third of staff now being supervised by remote bosses at least once each week.

A lack of contact in this manner can potentially be solved through video conferencing – with managers still able to manage their workers through regular meetings remotely while maintaining a face-to-face presence.

Reed’s group managing director Tom Lovell said: “Remote management offers many employers more flexibility and workers are welcoming the opportunity to approach their own role in a more independent way.”

He added that bosses are finding that they must adapt their management style to reflect this change.

The survey uncovered that 80 per cent of remotely-managed workers do not speak to those in charge every day and one in five actually said they can experience monthly periods where they do not connect with their boss.

Levels of face-to-face contact certainly seem to be dropping overall, with 40 per cent of staff saying they have witnessed a decrease in the last 12 months. However, 84 per cent of people being managed remotely also said that they were satisfied with the level of contact they have.